Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

obesity and the nation

October 10, 2006

We live in an age where obesity is an epidemic that is now infecting our health on all fronts. This disease is taking hold of our population. No one disputes the fact that we are living in a world of obesity. Depending upon which statistics you choose to rely upon, anywhere from 63% to 68% of the American population is overweight. Even our children are in danger with 1 in 15 kids being reported as obese. This is not an illness that can be passed biologically, but rather it travels in the form of lies and half truths. What’s worse is that so many people are turning to celebrities for the answer trying dangerous diets and pills that promise quick and miraculous returns only to leave the consumer upset, unmotivated and disenfranchised.

As fitness and nutrition professionals we realize the answer is daily exercise, increased physical activity and good nutritional habits. How do we provide this information in an impacting,and informative way? No single person can take on this epidemic. This fight takes fitness and nutrition professionals to help educate and inspire the public. So get started today with a healthier lifestyle. To learn more on how to do that, visit us click here

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diet and depression

October 10, 2006

By Amy Paturel Good news! Not only is working out good for your physical health, but it is beneficial to your emotional and mental health as well. Whether you’re dealing with personal issues, family problems, break-ups or work related stress, the last thing you may feel like doing may just be one of the best things for you. Research shows that any aerobic activity – even just a single bout or an easy stroll – can help put the mind at ease. Exercise produces a surge in mood-elevating hormones called endorphins, explains Cedric Bryant, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer of the American Council on Exercise. These natural “drugs” produce the same feelings elicited from addictive drugs like morphine, caffeine and alcohol. And yet, most of us are more apt to start our day with a jolt of java than jump on the treadmill each morning. How much moving and grooving do you need to do before you experience a mood lift? Research indicates that 20 to 40 minutes of aerobic exercise can result in reductions in anxiety and mood benefits that last for hours. But if you want to experience a true high from exercise, you may need to hit the streets – hard. A study reported in Runner’s World found that 80 percent of runners had a higher level of endorphins in their blood after a hard session compared to only 45 percent after an easy jog. And according to Bryant, levels of a mood-boosting brain chemical called norepinephrine, increase in direct proportion to the intensity and duration of exercise. What’s more, getting a certain number of miles under your sneakers can create an overwhelming sense of accomplishment. As with other highs, runner’s high is psychologically addictive. “It has an opiate-like effect,” says Bryant. Add to that the repetitive and rhythmic pounding associated with running and it’s no wonder that hard-core runners escape their thoughts and reach a state of euphoric bliss. Unfortunately, there’s no magic formula for achieving “runner’s high.” Scientists can’t pinpoint precisely what creates these effects. “It’s different for everyone,” says Bryant, “and quite honestly, I think scientists are learning that the more they learn about runner’s high, the more questions they have. Amy Paturel is a freelance writer for several publications, including Cooking Light and Health, and holds

fast food nation trailer

October 10, 2006

Fast food and obesity; diabetes

October 7, 2006

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Do you think Carmen Electra strip aerobics tape really works

October 6, 2006


tell us what you think

what do the celebrities do for working out; carmen electra, jessica alba

October 2, 2006

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the jacknife exercise with the stability ball

October 2, 2006

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great exercise

8 energy boosting foods

October 2, 2006

Fatigue is not fun. Worry, frustration, resentment, lack of sleep, anxiety, illness and poor diet are the top causes. Even mild forms of exhaustion can weigh heavy on our emotional and physical well-being. Luckily, our bodies are extremely resilient and many times we can conquer weariness by making a few dietary changes.

While most of us suffer from fatigue some of the time, there are millions who suffer from it all of the time. Exhaustion is one of the most common complaints brought to doctors. According to a recent National Sleep Foundation poll, one in five Americans say they’re so sleepy during the day it interferes with their activities
Fortunately, one of the best ways to fight fatigue is with energy-boosting foods, and eDiets.com Chief Nutritionist Susan Burke has put together a list of some of the best. Whether you’re in need of a quick energy boost or sustained, long-lasting fuel, she’s got the 4-1-1 on the foods that will do the job.
Quick Energy Boosters:
“The quickest energy is from carbohydrates. That’s the body’s first preferences for energy. Did you ever hear about carbohydrate loading? That’s what marathon runners do when they run a long race, they carb load. The reason they do that is because your body’s first preference for fuel is from stored carbohydrate, and you store carbohydrate as glycogen in your muscles and your liver.” For quick energy, you want to have glycogen stored and that comes from things like:
1. Vegetables
2. Whole-grain Cereals
3. 100-percent fruit juice
4. Dried fruit
5. Fresh fruit

“If you’re really hungry and you want some quick energy, there’s no better choice than eating some fruit. Rather than drinking a sugary drink, eat a piece of fruit. You’re going to get your carbohydrates and you’re also going to get your fiber and vitamins and minerals.”

Sustained Energy Boosters:
“A balance of nutrients is really what’s going to give you sustained energy because your body digests protein, fats and carbohydrates differently. In other words, you can eat them all at the same time but they are all going to be processed differently. Carbohydrates start being digested in your mouth, protein starts in your stomach and fat doesn’t start until it reaches your intestines. That’s why foods that are combinations of nutrients give you sustained energy.” Some good combinations choices include:
6. Nuts
7. Whole-grain pasta
8. Turkey or peanut butter on whole-grain br

will people continue to try fad diets

October 2, 2006

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) — Americans seem to have lost their appetite for fad diets, a new national survey finds.

More than two-thirds (69 percent) of respondents said they’re less likely to try a specialized or fad diet today compared to five years ago. Men are more skeptical than women of fad regimens, the survey found.

The poll, released Wednesday by the nonprofit group America On the Move, involved 2,339 adults age 18 or older. It found that many people do understand that eating less and being active is the best way to be healthy. A majority of respondents also believe business and government can play an important role in encouraging people to adopt healthy lifestyles.

Some other survey results:

Two-thirds of those surveyed said they’d started a new weight-loss or control program or diet at least once within the past five years. Sixty-five percent said those attempts to shed pounds failed, however.
Seven out of 10 respondents said they’re currently doing something to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight. Of those, 14 percent said their current diet, activity or program isn’t working, and they’re frustrated with the lack of success. Another 7 percent said their attempts at weight loss/control are working, but they’re not optimistic about long-term success.
One-third said that food and beverage companies need to create more choices and more affordable options for healthier foods.
Three-quarters of those polled percent said government has a role to play in tackling the obesity problem in the United States and helping people develop healthy lifestyles.
The survey was released during “America on the Move Week,” Sept. 23 to Sept. 30, at YMCAs across the country. Americans are encouraged to count the steps they take during this week in order to amass a nationwide total of more than a billion steps.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about weight control.

diet and depression

September 28, 2006

By Amy Paturel Good news! Not only is working out good for your physical health, but it is beneficial to your emotional and mental health as well. Whether you’re dealing with personal issues, family problems, break-ups or work related stress, the last thing you may feel like doing may just be one of the best things for you. Research shows that any aerobic activity – even just a single bout or an easy stroll – can help put the mind at ease. Exercise produces a surge in mood-elevating hormones called endorphins, explains Cedric Bryant, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer of the American Council on Exercise. These natural “drugs” produce the same feelings elicited from addictive drugs like morphine, caffeine and alcohol. And yet, most of us are more apt to start our day with a jolt of java than jump on the treadmill each morning. How much moving and grooving do you need to do before you experience a mood lift? Research indicates that 20 to 40 minutes of aerobic exercise can result in reductions in anxiety and mood benefits that last for hours. But if you want to experience a true high from exercise, you may need to hit the streets – hard. A study reported in Runner’s World found that 80 percent of runners had a higher level of endorphins in their blood after a hard session compared to only 45 percent after an easy jog. And according to Bryant, levels of a mood-boosting brain chemical called norepinephrine, increase in direct proportion to the intensity and duration of exercise. What’s more, getting a certain number of miles under your sneakers can create an overwhelming sense of accomplishment. As with other highs, runner’s high is psychologically addictive. “It has an opiate-like effect,” says Bryant. Add to that the repetitive and rhythmic pounding associated with running and it’s no wonder that hard-core runners escape their thoughts and reach a state of euphoric bliss. Unfortunately, there’s no magic formula for achieving “runner’s high.” Scientists can’t pinpoint precisely what creates these effects. “It’s different for everyone,” says Bryant, “and quite honestly, I think scientists are learning that the more they learn about runner’s high, the more questions they have. Amy Paturel is a freelance writer for several publications, including Cooking Light and Health, and holds